Scott Adcox

Doing More With Less Since 1972

Page 2 of 82

New Divide?

I can’t help but wonder if, even after all of this is “over”, we are going to be polarized along the lines of the two camps of “covidiots” and “alarmists”.

No matter where you stand today, chances are the health impacts won’t be exactly what you think they’ll be. They’ll be either more severe or less severe.

Same goes for impacts on the economy–none of us are probably spot on at this point in our predictions of exactly what will happen.

And then there’s the a whole different discussion around the impact on civil liberties.

But as we sit down to eat Thanksgiving dinner with 20 other people this year (I’m betting that won’t happen until NEXT year), will there be an anger lurking under the surface for some of us?

Is one person going to be mad at another because they didn’t take this seriously enough and added to the problem?

Or because they were in the camp that wanted to lock everything down unnecessarily and crash the economy?

I’m out of the loop and isolated for the most part, but I don’t see this one breaking down on political lines.

Not the pre-virus political lines anyway.

2018 Excalibur 10 Mile Race Report

;TLDR Version

Ran much faster than I thought I would (1:20:05)

Ran almost as fast as I could have–made a couple of small mistakes that probably cost me some time.

Still love this race. Still love this course.

Still would rather have some socks or a credit (maybe $3/race) at Running Zone instead of a medal or crown.

Long Version

Preparation

The Villarreal sisters are good at signing up for this race, but I always have to run it. Ok, maybe not always, but every time I’ve run it has been as a fill-in for one of them. Only one sister left to register and then bail on this race. After that, I guess I’ll have to register. To be fair, Lili was medically ineligible this time around and knew that well in advance. The plan was to run with my best Frienemy, El Sueño, and we even trained together for our long runs going into this. Unfortunately, he had to be out of town for a family emergency and I was left to go it alone on race day.

No worries though. Vitamin A brings it for the Main Event!

Kinda.

I think it’s fair to say I trained ok for this race. Not trained optimally, because I’ve only been running once or twice a week–usually a long run of 6-8 miles and then a really slow three miler thrown in there somewhere. Still, we’ve been running at a sub 9:00 pace on our long days and are still able to carry on a conversation, and we’ve done them all on Mondays after my hardest jiu jitsu class of the week on Sundays.

So miles have been low, but I think the intensity I’ve been training with in BJJ (tough 4 minute intervals) combined with actually spending some time on my feet making a running motion had me reasonably trained. I did not want to make the mistake I made in November and come in without much training at all.

As a result, I think I could have run a lot faster and probably PR’d if I’d focused on running for the weeks leading into this race. But I still enjoy training BJJ more, and would have despised running the whole time if I’d been missing out on that.

The reality is that there isn’t enough time in the day for me to do all the training I want, but I’m so fortunate to get to train as much as I do, so no complaints.

I was expecting to push myself and run at an 8:12 pace to get a finishing time of 1:21:59. Realistic, and I could be pretty happy with that.

Pre-Race

If you’ve read any of my race reports you know that I don’t hold back my honesty about race organizers. And I’ve never had a bad word to say about the Running Zone’s ability to put on a race. These guys pull it off perfectly every time. Lots of communication and information leading up to their races, everything runs on time, parking and bag check are always easy to navigate, lots of pace groups, etc. Just top notch.

I arrived at Viera High School at around 6:40 and was able to park pretty close to the start line. It seemed like the rush started right after I got there. It was a little chilly, so I held off on checking my bag to maximize my time in warm clothes. I sat down next to the concession stand and just relaxed as people came pouring in.

I was the only person I saw sitting.

This is so weird to me. We’re about to go do something kind of hard that requires us to be on our feet, so I’m going to do everything I can to stay off my feet for as long as I can. But all around me are people milling about, bouncing up and down to stay warm, and even warming up. I mean, I did a short warm up before the race too, but not 45 minutes before the race. My warm up routine isn’t close to that long.

But to each his own–just an observation.

Game Time!

I was planning on doing something similar to what I did the last time I ran this race, which worked out really well. If I could average 8:15 – 8:20 miles for the first two miles I should have enough information to figure out the rest of the race. I was not looking at mile splits on my watch, just monitoring the overall pace. Looking back at the splits later, I did a decent job of running the first two miles according to the plan–8:36 and 8:09. Slower than I wanted on the first one, but no problem making it up on the second.

Making it all up on the second was probably a mistake.

I was feeling good though. I decided to gradually start speeding up and check in with myself at the 5 mile mark. I honestly don’t remember much about what was happening on the course at this point. In fact, I was driving past Space Coast Stadium the other day and realized that I didn’t remember this part of the race at all. I know it was cool out because I wasn’t over heating.

Miles 3-5 were 8:02, 8:02, 7:59. I like that.

Still feeling good, so speed up just a little and hold it for 3 miles, then turn on the juice for the last two.

7:50, 7:41, 7:51

Uh-oh. That 7th mile at 7:40 came back to bite me. I don’t remember exactly what happened there, but my best guess is that I’d been putting in some effort on the gravel road portion of the course, which was kind of loose, and when I got back to cement I kept the effort level the same instead of dialing it back and keeping the pace the same. I really would have liked to hold onto that ten seconds for later in the race.

I did my best to go harder in the last two miles (7:42, 7:36) but didn’t have much left to accelerate. I started with a plan to speed up with a mile left, but then bargained for the last half mile, then the last quarter. I think most of the time I saved in the last mile was in the last 200 yards. I wouldn’t call it a “sprint”, but it was all I had. I crossed the finish line, walked a couple of steps, and then had to run again to get to the end of the chute so I could throw up on the grass and not the track.

Official finishing time was 1:20:05, so I missed the 8:00 pace by 0.5 seconds per mile. Ugh.

I probably could have made up some time in the first mile as well. Or by taking a little shorter liquid walk break at mile 6.

But if you’d told me at 6:30 that morning while I was driving there my finish time would be 1:20:xx I’d have been really happy, so no complaints.

2017 Space Coast Half Marathon Race Review

TL;DR Version…

Years and years of training have paid off. I’m happy I still know how to run mentally, even when the physical part isn’t there.

My cardio is really good, but my legs weren’t too happy about being asked to go that far without much run-specific training.

Official time: 2:02:14

I probably won’t run this race again. And that makes me a little sad.

Long Version

Pre-race

As always, packet pickup at the Running Zone was a piece of cake. I stopped in the Monday before the race, showed my ID, and was out of there in just a couple of minutes. Race packet included a nice long-sleeved shirt and a Moon Pie. Again, I really wish we could opt for some socks instead of another shirt. And I’d DEFINITELY rather have a pair of socks instead of a medal.

More on medals later.

I had a difficult time sleeping the night before the race. I’m not used to having to deal with this. Usually, I’ve put in my time training and trust in it, so I sleep like a baby the night before a race. This time, the longest run I’d done in training was 8 miles (5 weeks ago), and I had not run more than 10 miles since March 2014 (3.5 years). In the month leading up to the race I logged 15 miles total, with only one run longer than 3.2 miles. I knew I could cover 13.1 and run the whole thing, but wouldn’t know what to expect for a race time until I was actually out there.

I figured anything under 2:10:00 would be a great day.

I didn’t have any trouble getting up at 4:15 and heading to my SIL’s house to get a ride to the race. Luckily we were being dropped off and didn’t have to deal with parking. On the way there I realized I’d forgotten to bring my watch. Ugh…didn’t want to carry my phone, but missing the splits sounded like a worse option (nerd). I decided I’d just carry my phone in my hand and record the race with the Strava app. Not optimal, but whatever. I didn’t have huge expectations anyway.

I also realized I hadn’t eaten anything for breakfast. Hooray for planning.

This was my first time running the half at this event, which starts 30 minutes before the full. In my two times running the full, I really appreciated the fact that the course wasn’t crowded at all.

Not so with the half. Or maybe it was my fault.

The Race

I jumped in right after the 10:00/mile pace. I was pretty sure I could do that for the whole race since it was pretty cool outside. I could definitely do 10:00 miles for 7 or 8 miles. Unfortunately, a bunch people who had zero intentions of running anything close to that pace jumped in at the same point. The first mile was a whole lot of running up on to people walking and not having any space to get around them safely because of the crowds. Lots of people running were going at 12:00 plus pace.

This isn’t safe. It’s like getting on the freeway and driving 35 mph.

I hope this doesn’t come off as too whiney. I think it’s awesome that people get up early and go cover this distance, no matter how fast they do it and no matter if they walk or run. And I’m not a snob about running either–I’m well aware that my best day ever running would be an embarrassingly slow day for a whole lot of people.

But please, people, go out with the group that’s running the pace you intend to run.

Corrals with qualifying times for entry would be nice for this race.

So the first mile was much slower than I’d intended. I wasn’t sure what pace it was because I’d decided not to look at pace/time on my phone at all. The biggest reason was that I wasn’t even sure I had enough battery left on my phone to capture the whole thing and turning on the screen would be a battery drain. LOL.

I was eventually able to get to a stable pace. I wasn’t sure exactly how fast I was going, but I was pretty sure I could carry it for 13.1 though (thanks Experience). I started coming up with an off-the-cuff plan. I figured I’d run this pace for the first 8, then increase it a little bit there if I still felt good. If I was still feeling good at 10 mile mark I’d run the last 5k as hard as I could.

First 8 splits:
10:27, 9:55, 9:45, 9:30, 9:33, 9:37, 9:20

Looking back, I’m extremely happy with those splits. I felt really good at the 6 mile mark and had to hold myself back a little bit. I took a very quick cup of water and a cup of Gatorade around mile 7ish and thought I’d be pretty good on liquid for the rest of the race. But it reminded me that I hadn’t eaten breakfast, so I decided I’d get a Gu and sip it for the rest of the race too. Even after speeding up a little for miles 9 and 10 (8:59, 8:42) I still was holding back a bit. I was passing a lot of people, and I knew I’d have a decent 5k left in me at the 10 mile mark.

Course note here: I passed a lot of people who were staying to the extreme right of the courses, even when it curved to the left. Run the apex of curves.

The last 5k felt like a regular ol’ 5 k (8:11, 8:07, 8:00). I didn’t have much in the legs, but mental energy can get you through a 5k. Again, I’m really glad I had some experience to fall back on. “Yeah, this sucks and your legs are going to hurt tomorrow, but you’ve felt this many times before, and it’s JUST 5k.”

Official Finish Time: 2:02:14

Like I said, I was passing a lot of people during those last 5 miles. Because I’m a nerd I was able to glean from the results that I passed 457 from the 10k point. No one passed me. So I was probably a little too conservative at the start, but that’s the side I’d prefer to err on.

Post Race

I’m very happy with this result considering how under-trained I was. I’m very disappointed with this result because I know I could have easily PR’d on this day if I’d trained.

Flat course and perfect conditions.

Finish line was awesome again this year–cold wet towels to help cool off, a beach towel with the race logo on it, a nice finisher’s medal, plenty of food and drink without long lines, and a relatively easy time getting to and from the finish line for spectators. Also, the finish line is where you pick up your bonus medal for doing 3 and/or 5 of the last 5 races.

And here’s where we get into the medal discussion/controversy/complaining…whatever you want to call it.

The Running Zone made a very smart marketing move a few years ago when they came up with the idea of giving “super-special” medals for completing the next 5 (or 3 of the 5) races. There’s a segment of people out there who love medals, and the Space Coast Marathon medals are really nice if that’s what you’re into. The result at the end of the five years is that it’s tough to get into the 13.1 distance for this race. I’m not sure if the full sold out.

So now they’ve decided to do ANOTHER special medal program over the next four years with even BIGGER and fancier medals, and they’ll be adding a SECOND half marathon course that is run over the first half of the full marathon course. So now there will be TWO different half marathons and they can take twice as many runners.

If you are into medals, get in on this. They had the new ones on display at the finish area, and the things are HUGE.

The downside for me is that there will be close to twice as many people running.

I get it. This makes economic sense. It’s twice as many people paying entry fees.

But for me, the product they are now selling and the product I want to buy are two different things.

They are selling big fancy medals for completing the distance. What I’ve always been buying is an incredible race experience on a fast course with smaller crowds and manageable race day logistics. I’d pay a higher entry fee to continue enjoying this race that way.

Honestly, I think the fee has always been an incredible bargain.

I’m not really sure what that finishing area is going to look like next year with 3,000 more runners and their families.

I think my best option is to just come out the day before the race and run the course by myself. Or the week before.

Or whenever I want. I’m old enough an ornery enough now that I figure I don’t need someone else to validate for me that the “race” counts.

I’ve already heard people saying, “I don’t want to run the North section of the course.” So I’m sure a bunch of folks will just try run the South course even though they are North registrants, making it more crowded. And adding people to the North section alone means people running the full marathon may have to navigate around these crowds–the South section has usually thinned out by the time the full participants get there.

In short, what I always enjoyed as a small local race is starting to morph into a big race. Nothing wrong with that if that’s what you want to be, just not what I’m looking for.

I think this may be a microcosm where running is headed in general. I think it’s a little bit of a shame when I perceive people running for medals. Let’s face it–these are adult participation trophies for all but a few people [Spoiler–I’m never going to win this or any other race]. And it seems like more and more people are out there with nice gear that lets you know they are “running for wine” or “running for beer” or whatever.

I’d like to see more people out there after suffering through months of training and going out on race day trying to get PRs or complete the distance for the first time. Again, I’m not being a running snob or anything here. It’s not about how fast someone can run, it’s about going through the process and suffering to find out how fast YOU can run.

I know first-hand that really dedicating yourself to running and a difficult training program can have a tremendously positive impact on peoples’ lives.

If you cross the finish line and feel like the only thing you got from the process was a piece of mass-produced metal, you’re missing out on the best of what running has to offer you. That’s my opinion anyway.

Maybe it seems ironic that I’m writing this after running a race without training and missing a golden opportunity to PR.

I get that too.

Quick Notes From 10.24.2017 BJJ Training

Got my butt kicked in KOTM. Super tired from Saturday/Sunday/Monday workouts.
We worked on the sweep, bicep cutter, and omoplata roll  from Lasso Guard
For the sweep:
  • Get a strong passing headquarters–drill this correctly every time
  • Lasso foot flexed into lat
  • Bottom foot across the hip, and as opponent circles underhook the leg
  • Bring hand to ear, picking up his knees and loading him up
  • Thrust hips up to toes for bicep cutter
For bicep cutter from the bottom
  • bait the pass and follow leg through with arm
  • Figure four the legs
  • Both hands just below shoulder. Pull down, hips up, push out
For Omoplata:
  • As he passes, stop his hips with your hands
  • Base out on elbow so he is driving you into the floor (floor doesn’t move)
  • Scoot-circle out and forward roll over the shoulder you have lasso grip with

Closed Guard To Side Guard To Back Take

Haven’t posted in a while, but I’ve been taken a ton of notes. I’m working on a process to use Scrum methodologies to improve BJJ. I’m almost at the end of my first sprint, and it’s going pretty well so far. I hope to be posting on it soon. If nothing else, this is a good place to post the retrospectives until I figure out the process better.

Still, I need to get back to posting technique details. Here’s some stuff from 10.17.2017

  • In a tight closed guard, and they go for a grip to try to pass
  • Grab the cuff with the opposite hand (*thumb tight to pointer to get super tight)
  • Slide hand under for kimura grip and break their grip up.
  • Immediately stuff their hand into holster with wrist behind theirs for extra leverage
  • As you stuff, pull in legs to help break their posture
  • Open guard and feet to the mat as you grab lat
  • Shrimp, stuff arm, and pull the lat at the same time to get them to their side and take back.
  • If they are based out, climb on top of the turtle
  • Post with head and elbow, then hook at their elbow with the opposite arm
  • Pull that arm out for a down bar OR
  • Knee to mat and bring shin to the back of their head and drive toes to the mat for pressure
  • Grip leg behind the knee and roll over same shoulder you’re holding the arm with to roll into arm bar

The grip break part is covered by Chewey‘s video, and the second part is kinda sorta covered by Buchecha. The roll into the arm bar I’m still looking for.

And here’s some footage of rolling session:

Daily Reading List — October 7th

How Puerto Rico Can Rebuild And Become The Hong Kong Of The West – Not. Bloody. Likely.

Has fitness gone too far? – I’m not saying this can’t be a problem for a small percentage of people. But when I’m out and about, it doesn’t seem to be a front-page issue.

Police Search For ‘Mad Pooper’ Who Dumps And Runs – Pretty sure I know this chick. Didn’t know she moved from Knoxville though.

Health Care Providers Can Use Design Thinking to Improve Patient Experiences – ” In Mary’s case, she couldn’t explain her concerns through the standard patient experience survey, which is initiated after an appointment and which comprises general questions focused on the medical visit. Were it not for the hospital administrator’s initiative to ask Mary what was going on, her concerns may have gone both unnoticed and unaddressed.”

But the box has been checked.

You Can’t Sweat Out Toxins. That Doesn’t Mean Sweating Isn’t Good For You. – I’m healthy as a horse. A lathered horse.

Apple Watch To Be Sold Alongside Aetna Health Insurance Plans – Interesting.

Error 404: A Look At Digital Decay – It’s a little bit like the destruction of the Library at Alexandria; if the Library at Alexandria kept up with what you ate for lunch every day.

How the Heroes and Villains of Game of Thrones Pay (and Dodge) Their Debts – “You accidentally slapped me in the face, so now I get to slap you in the face.” ~My kids. Daily.

BJJ Level Up Blue

On June 27, 2016 we took our three little girls to the soft opening of a new Brazilian jiu jitsu gym in Cocoa Beach. I had more awareness of BJJ than the average person at the time (I don’t think I’ve ever mistaken it for karate), but had never considered training for me. I just wanted my girls to learn skills that would allow them to react without panicking if they’re ever placed in a situation they needed to get out of.

Luckily I was wearing shorts and a t-shirt. Surprise! The instructors casually asked if I’d like to give it a shot, and I said “sure”. Oddly, this is almost exactly how I ended up playing rugby.

After an hour of being rag-dolled and choked by guys and gals 60 pounds lighter than me, I knew I had to do this. And the Missus loved it just as much as me. I didn’t know at the time what a huge bonus that would be for my training.

Last night we were awarded blue belts by Professor Frank Livorsi along with my buddies Ed (started the same night as us) and Dr. Dan. It was so cool to be able to share this accomplishment with my FAVORITE person in the whole world and two really good guys like Ed and Dan.

I nerd out and track everything, so in answer to the “how long does it take to get your blue belt” question…

  • 202 training sessions
  • 356 hours of mat time
  • 456 days
  • ~1000 pounds of sweat (I lose ~6 pounds of water weight in a good session)
  • 1 Competition with a 2-1 record
  • 1 industrial sized washing machine to keep 5 people’s gis from stinking at training
  • 10 chronically sore fingers
  • 1 scattered, covered, smothered, smashed, chunked, diced, and topped ego (there’s still plenty left to be grounded out
  • Countless hours of talking about BJJ in the car and on the couch

We’re unbelievably lucky to have happened upon a place with such amazing coaches and teammates. This little gym on the beach has become a second family to us. We get to learn in a safe and friendly environment, and have training partners who push and encourage us every day.

From what I hear, this is where the fun really starts, and I’m super excited to continue this journey.

Turtle Attack Review – BJJ Training 8.22.2016

I was pretty happy when I found out we were going to review the Bow and Arrow and Rodeo chokes from Turtle position. I remember going over these, and I remember how awkward they were for me the first time. I’ve been in the position to use these quite a few times, but couldn’t recall in the moment what the steps were to execute them.

I couldn’t believe when I went back and reviewed my notes that it was almost a year ago when we first went over the Rodeo choke, and last November since we set up the Bow and Arrow from turtle.

I as really excited to find during drilling these two that they were a little less clumsy for me. Here are the details I was able to record by writing notes in class, which is something I’ve switched to instead of trying to remember details after an exhausting hour of getting beat up by Ed.

Bow and Arrow:

  • Opponent in turtle
  • Drive knee into pocket and grip the opposite shoulder. Work to get knee to the mat
  • Opposite hand in to open the lapel. Don’t reach so deep that you can be rolled. Pull it down to get it tight to his neck
  • Hand under neck, thumb in and deep.
  • Opposite hand on the small of back to keep him down
  • Switch the leg in the pocket and step around to opposite pocket
  • Hand into the hole between his heel and thigh
  • Forward roll and shoot leg deep
  • Other leg over shoulder

Rodeo:

  • Same setup as Bow and Arrow, but instead of stepping over into the opposite pocket, swing leg all the way around (spin) to sit on head/neck.
  • Fall back, pinch knees, leg press out and down

Crucifix From Side Control – BJJ 8.18.2017

  • Tight side control
  • Push far arm back at bicep
  • Grab and pull arm back with hand under head
  • Peel opponent up
  • Switch hips and step over the arm–grip foot at ankle and pull it tight
  • Gable grip and slide knee under
  • Figure 4 legs

Like this, but tighter…

Submissions off of crucifix:

  • Peel close lapel down and go thumb in with opposite hand
  • Tuck elbow to the hip for choke
  • Bring arm to front end and forearm slice trapped arm with shin. Can switch let position and grip from undereath to aid this one
  • Thumb in opposite lapel and leg over to choke on the close side

During rolls, I figured out something cool. I was attempting the modified flower sweep we learned on Tuesday, but my opponent was keen to it since he’d learned the same technique. He wasn’t allowing me to get the pant grip or the underhook and had a firm grip on my wrist. I went ahead and attempted the sweep, but instead of punching the pant grip (that I didn’t have) up as we rolled, I punched the wrist he was gripping towards the wall. A little bit more effort, but the same result.

Modified Flower Sweep – BJJ Training 8.15.2017

New mats at the gym, so a bunch of our warm up drills were 20% longer than I’m used to. It actually made a difference!

Technique was a modified flower sweep that I liked a lot:

  • Pistol grip at the cuffs
  • Grip opposite pant at the knee: KEY TIP: if there isn’t enough cloth to grab, pull opponent in with your knees to create some slack. Also tried this with underhooking the leg so that it will work with no-gi.
  • Elbows tight
  • Bring foot on the cuff grip side to the mat and pivot body (not a shrimp!)
  • Bring other foot (knee grip side) high and push your shin into their armpit
  • This should make them reach and touch the mat. When they do, chop the leg you put into armpit across their body while punching up with the knee grip

Arm bar variation:

  • As you punch over, you may feel you aren’t getting the sweep or you may just have a good opportunity to swing your leg over their head, scoot in, and finish the arm bar

Six minute rolls with Jim, Abraham, and Brad. Brad is a complete animal–thanks for reading! 🙂

We also did some no-gi rolling for some video footage for one of Coach Frank’s sponsors: JiuJitsuThing.com who have some pretty cool t-shirts you should check out!

 

Daily Reading List — August 7th

It’s a Waffle House world

The Cost Of Light Through The Ages

Open APIs: A nerdy phrase with big meaning for health care

Japanese Manners Made Easy – When I worked for a Japanese company, they offered an Intro to Japanese class. It wasn’t just an intro to the language, but very much an intro to the culture, and it came in very handy when visiting. There’s a lot to learn, but I wouldn’t really mind if we had a little more here.

Visualizing the Jobs Lost to Automation

Introducing Backup and Sync for Google Photos and Google Drive – Just had someone asking me about this the other day. BAM!

Better Everything. For Everyone. All $3. – Want to give this a shot.

Interactive Periodic Table of the Elements, in Pictures and Words – This looks like a dang good ‘un for kids to check out.

More Chokes From Turtle – BJJ Training July 27, 2017

I’m trying out keeping paper notes during class instead of trying to remember the steps to technique after class and dictating it into my phone. I’m usually so beat at the end of class I don’t even know my own name, so writing it down as I see it may help a little.

With a turtled up opponent:

Went over Peruvian neck tie from Tuesday

Quick and dirty choke if they defend the PNT is to take the slack out of the lapel and go four fingers in DEEP. Coming over the arm, lace your arm in and hand back up to a karate chop position on the back of opponent’s neck.

For the loop choke, get the four finger grip same as above and pull arm out by the triceps to make space to rotate and round and get the head in. Duck head in and get leg, post front leg up. Sit through (just like the drill) and figure four the leg you’re holding. If no tap, keep the figure four at the ankle and come up to the half-guard. There’s a knee bar there by thrusting hips towards the ground.

Peruvian Neck Tie – BJJ Training July 25, 2017

We worked on getting to the ground from a failed double leg shot where the opponent defended by shooting an under hook. We clamp down with the over hook and get our head out, stepping backward and exposing their head which we wrap up similar to a guillotine:
  • Stuff trapped arm in and grab with neck gripping arm
  • Strong grip over the wrist to tighten up
  • Hop backwards to get to the ground
  • Close knee scoots toward their body
  • Step in deep (hamstring heavy on their head)
  • Push in and come up to foot on knee side
  • Immediately sit back to hip and throw foot over the back

Daily Reading List — July 11th

A Brief History Of Rugby Teams Trying To Respond To The Haka

Jiu Jitsu Will Teach You To Love Your Body No Matter What It Looks Like – It doesn’t hurt to be at your lifetime peak of rippedness at 44 either.

Top 100 Companies in 2017 Forbes Global 2000 shown in D3 Bubble

How it feels to learn JavaScript in 2016 – Hacker Noon – This is so 2016. No one has conversations like this in 2017.

State Word Map – Flarda is Misspelled – Best xkcd in a while. But they misspelled Flarda.

Second-Order Consequences of Self-Driving Vehicles – I’m long on alcohol stocks for sure. That’s in my fantasy trading account of course.

Why you think you’re getting worse

Wrestling’s Superstars Are Invading Hollywood – Don’t be tricked into paying your hard-earned money to see a John Cena movie. You can’t see him!
*ba dum chh*

Knee On Belly Flow – BJJ Training 6.29.2017

For the last few training sessions we’ve been working on options from side control that are all based on knee on belly.

  • Gable grip and shoulder pressure from side control
  • Shallow thumb-in collar grip on head side hand
  • Leg side hand finds belt know
  • Elbows tight!
  • Knuckle push up to KOB, pull in, posture up, hips forward
  • Wait for hand reaction and shoot leg side hand through the loop, bringing them tight to your chest
  • Step over with head-side leg and talk on the phone with their wrist
  • “I Dream Of Jeanie” downbar, americana, kimura, unorthodox kimura or…
  • If they sit up, rotate hips out to go for omoplata
  • If they roll from there, cross legged arm bar option
    • If they hitch hiker out, back to the omoplata
  • If they posture up
    • figure four the legs and loop hand under leg for grip on cuff
    • straighten legs and lift the looped hand
    • step over head  and release cuff for an S-mount

Yeah…a whole lot of stuff there, but it’s fun just to flow through it all. Crazy how many submission options you see during this flow that I didn’t even list here. Like, if you don’t get the hips out to go for the firs omoplata, there are arm bars, kimuras, and scissor chokes from that weird position we’ve worked on in the past.

Last night I was very out of gas for rolling. I basically just survived and tried to not get submitted. Didn’t get submitted, but got crushed by pretty much everyone.

And I didn’t ask permission to use the Neon Belly image, but hopefully a link is good too.

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